PIRIFORMIS SYNDROME PAIN

Sciatica Pain caused by Piriformis syndrome

 

Sciatica Pain caused by Piriformis syndrome is a result of the Piriformis muscle pressing against the sciatic nerve creating a pain in the buttock region and sometimes spreading to the back of the legs. In many instances the condition will create pain going all the way down to the foot. Women tend to suffer more than men with Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome. It is also a common syndrome for athletes (such as runners or hill climbers).

Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome can also attack when the Piriformis muscle tightens or has a spasm and thus puts pressure on the sciatic nerve that runs just underneath it. This added pressure can cause pain in the lower back region and can also spread to the buttock area and behind the legs. The pain is similar to sciatica. Piriformis syndrome itself does not constitute sciatic pain. Sciatica is when the nerve root that exits the spine is compressed. But, just like sciatica, Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome causes pain as well as a tingling sensation or a numb feeling along the path of the sciatic nerve, which runs through the leg and into the foot.

Diagnosing Piriformis syndrome

Strangely enough there appears to be no diagnostic test for Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome. We know that it is the cause of irritation of the sciatic nerve. The patient’s symptoms combined with a physical examination often leads to a diagnosis of Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome. In more cases than not patients who suffer from Piriformis syndrome speak of pain (similar to sciatic pain) running down the back of their legs or in the buttocks.

Symptoms of Piriformis syndrome

Typical symptoms for those suffering Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome may include a dullish ache in the buttock, usually in the middle or center region. A pain in the leg, particularly the back of the legs (a sciatic pain) and the patient may experience pain and suffering particularly when climbing stairs or walking uphill. There is also pain following long periods of being seated. Sometimes the only way to relieve the pain of Piriformis syndrome is to lie on one’s back. The pain can be aggravated by long periods of being seated as well as by running or walking for long periods at a time.

Doctors diagnosing Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome would probably carry out a physical examination to determine whether or not the sciatic nerve is being compressed with the Piriformis muscles. There are similar conditions causing Sciatica Pain and Piriformis syndrome and an X-Ray or nerve-conduction test would normally be used to determine if this is the case.